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Should You Let Your Tenants Have Grills?

Father and Son Grilling in Yard of Greenwood Rental PropertyIf you own Greenwood single-family rental properties, you may be unsure whether to allow tenants to have a grill. For a number of reasons, such as the serious fire risk they present and the potential for injury, grills should not be permitted on the property. However, you should balance these risks with your tenant’s ability to enjoy living in your rental property. Tenants who reject your wishes and bring a grill onto the property despite your ban on them are among the issues that may arise as a result of prohibiting grills. It’s essential to weigh the advantages and disadvantages of letting your tenants have a grill before making a decision.

American culture heavily favors the use of barbecue grills and smokers. One is owned by up to seven out of ten adults in the United States. Grills, however, are cited as the cause of 10,600 home fires on average each year by the National Fire Protection Association. Additionally, grill-related injuries send almost 20,000 people to the emergency room each year. Gas or propane grills, the most common type of grill on the market, are to blame for the majority of these fires and injuries. It is obvious that allowing grills on your property is not such a good idea due to the potential for injury or fire.

The potential mess they can create is another disadvantage of allowing grills. Charcoal grills create ashes, and all grills can leave greasy messes on a deck or patio. If your tenant does not know how to thoroughly dispose of ashes or clean their grill with the appropriate cleaners, they may cause property damage. Many surfaces are difficult to clean of grease, and ashes left outside in the wind can coat the outside of the house. It’s challenging to clean up either mess. The heat from a grill can also cause damage, such as melting vinyl siding or scorching wooden decks or railings. Because it can be difficult to determine whether a tenant will use and clean up after their grill responsibly, you may conclude that prohibiting grills is the best course of action.

The provision of a grill to your tenants does, however, come with some benefits. Probably the most significant advantage is that allowing grills will make your tenants happy and improve tenant relations. Tenants want to enjoy living in their rental, and given the widespread popularity of grills, allowing them to have one may encourage them to remain in your rental property for a longer period of time.

Allowing tenants to have a grill is a good practice for Greenwood property managers because it may deter lease violations. Sadly, there’s a good chance that even if you tell your tenant they can’t have a grill, they’ll still bring one onto the property and then try to hide it. Alternatively, you may want to consider allowing a grill with some common sense precautions. Electric grills, for instance, are safer and less likely to start structural fires than other grill types. This is due in part to the fact that there are no open flames on electric grills. Even if it isn’t your tenant’s first choice, allowing them to use an electric grill could help you to keep good relations with them while bypassing the more serious risks associated with gas or charcoal grills. You could also consider educating them on grill maintenance and cleanup procedures. In the long run, you may find that a compromise regarding grills benefits both you and your tenant, especially if it increases the chances that they will comply with the lease terms.

Ultimately, allowing tenants to have a grill depends on your rental property, priorities, and situations. Regardless of your decision, it is essential to establish good communication with your tenant, include clear language in the lease, and respond to your tenant’s requests promptly and professionally.

Would you like to know more about maintaining a successful Greenwood rental property and good tenant relations at the same time? Contact us online today or call us directly at 317-484-8444!

 

Originally published: March 12, 2021

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